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14 Online Tools to Supercharge Your English Language and Writing Skills in 2021

Are you having difficulty with learning the English language, both spoken and written words? Are you fed up with your lack of progress? Confused about which tools are the most reliable and helpful for learning the language? This article is for you.

The English Language can be a complex language to understand for first-time learners; even native English speakers struggle with keeping up with all its rudiments and laws. You don’t need to get a PhD degree in English to supercharge your English skills.

Relax, take a deep breath and try simpler and faster means. There are enough online tools on the Internet today that can get you from a mediocre or zero-knowledge English speaker to a competent one within a month.

All you got to do is to commit yourself to learn and let the online tools do the rest.

Why do you need to improve your English Language and Writing Skills?

As a native English speaker, you grew up singing English, breeding English and talking English. What more can these online tools teach you that you already don’t know?  We get it. You don’t want to be a professor of English; you already know enough to communicate fluently in English. So, why should you use online tools?

Improving your English skill is a continuous process, the more you improve it, the better you communicate. In the course of reading, listening to audios and videos and others, even talking to friends, we come across words we have never heard before or terms we aren’t sure of the meaning. These unfamiliar words are not there to embarrass us but to expand our vocabulary.

As a non-English speaker, online tools can represent an alternative or supplement to physical English language classes. If you need budget-friendly language learning options, there are numerous free learning tools online to help.

Here are various reasons why using online tools to improve your English Language and writing skills is a top-notch idea.

  1. A Universal Language

Google countries where English is either their official, second or third language, and you have nearly a third of countries in the world. If that doesn’t make you recognize it as a universal language already, other facts will.

English is, without doubt, a popular and widely spoken language in the world, with presence in all continents. From Africa to Europe, to Asia, to North America, to South America, to Antarctica and Australia, English covers every continent. It is a universal language that is acceptable in many countries.

There are approximately 1.75 billion English speakers in 106 countries, which represents approximately 20% of the world’s population. One in every five people speaks the English language in the world. Want to learn a universal language? English is your best bet.

  1. Better Communication and Expression

It is a simple fact that the more in-depth your knowledge of English is, the better your communication range. Whether it is the official language, the second, third or fourth language of your country, improving your English helps you to better communicate and express yourself in the language.

Think about it. With the English language, you can communicate with a society of nearly 2 billion people in over106 countries.

 

  1. Better Job Opportunities

There are numerous jobs you can acquire from just improving your English. You can get a job as a news anchor, radio presenter, journalist, editor, writer, English tutor and lots more. Many multinational companies are employing English speakers as they view English as an essential language to have in the business world. It gives you an edge in your job.

 

  1. The language of the Internet

Many online articles and websites use the English language as their official language. You enjoy the natural understanding of a substantial part of the internet data from learning and improving your English. 

14 Online Tools to Improve Your English language and Writing Skills

The Internet is full of tools you can use to learn just about anything. It is the most extensive database in human history. Need access to instant information? You will find it on the Internet.

Here are some of the tools the Internet has to offer that helps you become a better English speaker or writer.

  1. Grammar Girl

Grammar Girl by Mignon Fogarty is an excellent tool to help improve your understanding of English grammar.

English students often complain or frown at the difficulty of Grammar rules. To a non-native English speaker looking to improve his language (English) skills, grammar rules can be confusing and easy to miss out.

Grammar Girl is a great online resource to learn about English grammar and other language rules. It focuses on providing quick and ‘dirty’ tips to make you a better writer of the English language. Instead of teaching it the way a boring language tutor would, the site uses unconventional, ‘dirty’ and unforgettable tips that improve your language.

Whether you love grammar or you suck at it, Grammar Girl is an excellent pick for you. Its unconventional way of teaching the language is fun, exciting and excellent for memory retention.

Want to have fun while learning the basics of English grammar? Are you tired of the serious demeanours of other resources that aren’t working for you? Grammar Girl is the answer.

The site drops blog posts and podcasts on the common and the not-so-noticeable grammar issues that are popular among English learners and speakers. It does not just point out the wrong usage of grammar; it also explains why it is wrong, and which alternatives are right. You get detailed explanations about the rules behind punctations and word usage.

Learning and improving your English skills is made easy with the Grammar Girl website. It explains complicated English grammar in a fun and straightforward way. It also offers helpful tips and shortcuts to help you remember the seeming inconsistencies of the English language. Grammar Girl teaches you the difference between passive and active voice and other English lessons in a fun and conversational tone.

    1. Grammarly

Grammarly is an essential tool for everyone looking to improve their language skills. Writing with Grammarly makes your job easier.

Let’s face it, as an English learner; you are going to make mistakes. The so-called professionals do; it is not something to feel sad about; instead, it is something to improve on.

How? Keep writing. The best way to improve language skills apart from speaking is to write and have an editor show you your mistakes and offer corrections. Getting a professional editor to do this can be costly, and you won’t have on-demand access to the editor all the time.

Grammarly is the on-demand online editor you need to improve your language skills. It spots all writing errors and suggests changes. When you are writing, the app offers you improvements to your article by profiling according to the audience you have set and the tone you want to give to the text.

Grammarly is a brilliant online resource for improving your vocabulary and making gold your writing skills. It functions as an online word processor and offers better correction suggestions than your typical word processor. Grammarly highlight over 250 types of English writing errors. It also suggests similar words for repeated words and to improve the context.

Additionally, Grammarly prepares reports to help improve your writing: how many mistakes you made, what your weak spots are, and what your articles’ average “rating” is. There’s even a reward part included: you will receive Grammarly badges as you improve.

The app is compatible with Google Sheets, Medium, Chrome, Microsoft Word and others. The app is compatible with almost everything you need. Grammarly is a powerful and indispensable tool for both fluent and non-fluent English speakers. It is both an invaluable language tool for early English learners and students.

The Grammarly app is available for on the web, and it also has a Grammarly keyboard for mobile phones. You can install Grammarly as a plugin to your Chrome browser and your Microsoft Word app. Grammarly also checks plagiarism for its premium subscribers. Although it is free to install and use, Grammarly has a premium plan where prices vary for different plans. You have to buy the premium plan to enjoy the best of Grammarly suggestions.

  1. Hemingway

Hemingway is a popular site for students, early learners, editors and authors. This tool allows you to assess the complexity of a sentence. The software highlights incomprehensible or overly complicated sentences and offers personalized suggestions to help you streamline and simplify your text.

It is a beautiful web-based and desktop standalone software to assist you in editing your written English. The Hemingway App tackles tons of nuances in English writing, like very complex sentences, uses of passive, overuse of adverbs, and far more. Getting it as standalone desktop software for your Mac and Windows costs $9.99.

The desktop app also provides a readability score for the entered text, which you’ll use to know how complicated or straightforward is the content you’ve written. The app highlights all of your wordy sentences in yellow and extraneous content highlighted in red.

  1. Microsoft Word Help

We all know that Microsoft Word is a writing app for writing documents. What many of us don’t know is that it has a world help section that can be extremely beneficial to new English learners.

Microsoft World Help is Microsoft guide to language learning. There are a whole bunch of guides and tutorials to help you use the right words and boost your language skills; for example, learn how to capitalize your English text correctly and to differentiate between words that sound similar.

Whether it’s grammar or the structure of your sentences, Microsoft Word Help is here to help students and early learners master the English language quickly.

  1. Thesaurus

Find yourself constantly repeating the same words? Are you searching for a quick way to learn new words but don’t want to read a whole vocabulary of words? The Thesaurus your best friend if you let it be.

How does it work? You search a word that you know or are unfamiliar about, and the Thesaurus produces a bunch of synonyms (similar words) that you can substitute for that word. It also shows a bunch of antonyms (opposite words) for the searched word.

Thesaurus is an excellent tool for those looking to improve their language skills. Even the most reputable authors and English gurus use Thesaurus from time to time. In addition to synonyms and definitions, you will find grammar advice, quizzes and much more on the Thesaurus site. You can try out the fun quizzes to test your knowledge of the language.  

The Thesaurus is one of the vital learning tools that every English student should have in their arsenal of tools for developing their language skills. Building on your vocabulary is essential in becoming better at English and Thesaurus offers just that.

Thesaurus helps students in becoming better speakers and writers by providing alternative words and phrases to express themselves in English perfectly. Thesaurus offers the most straightforward collection of synonyms and antonyms that you could use to enhance your vocabulary while learning the English language.

Whatever your message could be, if you’re looking to simplify your written English, Thesaurus will come to your help frequently. This website also features a collection of a number of the foremost overused words that you should try to avoid frequently using in your communications. You get to sharpen your English skills with this powerful online and mobile application tool.

  1. Daily Writing Tips

You can improve your language skills quickly and easily by spending five minutes a day on the Daily Writing Tips website. Five minutes a day? Yes, you can spend more but five minutes a day consistently over some time will boost your language skills for the better.

As you might have guessed, the Daily Writing Tips site offers daily tips to help you improve your language skills. New tips get added every day for you to learn every day. The tips are often presented in the form of articles, and you can sometimes test your knowledge through quizzes. Whether you want to deepen your spelling, grammar, punctuation, or even vocabulary, Daily Writing Tips will help you improve your English quickly.

  1. Grammar Book

Grammar Book is another simple online resource to assist you in improving your language skills. The online resource assists you learn punctuation and grammar rules through its fun quizzes and engaging blog posts.

The Grammar Book’s blog gets updated every Tuesday with a fresh blog post for both language learners. You can participate in the Grammar quizzes to enhance your English grammar skills. It also offers ‘The Blue Book of Grammar and Punctuation’, to assist your language skills.

  1. Readability-Score

Your writing has got to look and feel attractive to your readers, or they will lose interest in what you are writing. It is not just a tool to help you improve your English communication; it is a tool to help you improve the readability score of your English posts, which is also very important. If your post isn’t easy for the reader to read, there’s no point in writing it in the first place.

Choose any of your favourite articles on the online, and these articles have the most uncomplicated prose and text layout, which only cause you to read more. Readability is a facet of writing which many writers fail to take note of. Regardless of how grammatically correct your sentences are, considering the readability factor is essential in writing better English.

Readability-score is a web resource that helps writers calculate the readability of your text. On a scale of 0 to 100, it scores the text you entered for its readability factor. The higher your score, the higher is your content.

  1. Aztekera Passive Checker

A considerable problem English students and early learners face is knowing when to use the active voice and passive voice. The active is the voice that is more concise and easy. Use of passive voice more often hampers communication to an enormous extent.

The active voice shows confidence. Learn to spice up your language skills by using more active voice. The site offers a free online tool that helps eliminate passive phrases in your writing.

The excessive use of passive voice could be the rationale for the non-persuasive tone of your writing and speaking. Eliminate such sort of occurrence using Aztekera passive checker tool.

  1. Grammar Monster

Grammar Monster is one of the best resourceful tools on the Internet to help you improve your language skills. Whatever basics you need to know as an English learner about the English grammar, Grammar Monster is the place to look.

With free resources in punctuations such as apostrophe’s and commas, prepositions, adverbs, adjectives, etc., Grammar Monster has an extensive collection of articles to boost your language skills.

The easy-to-learn chunks of data presented on Grammar Monster make it one among the most straightforward online resources to enhance one’s language skills. It is entirely free to use.

  1. Pro Writing Aid

Pro Writing Aid is a lovely online resource to supercharge your language and writing skills. It is the industry-standard text editing software. The Pro Writing Aid app is available as a free version for web interfaces. You get to edit your text online for up to 3000 words with the free web tool.

Pro Writing Aid also checks the entered content for plagiarism, usage of vague/abstract words, alliteration analysis and more. These cool features are in addition to the regular spell-checking and other grammar tools. The tool is popular among published actors and editors and helps amplify your English writing skills. It is also an excellent tool for English learners.

  1. Reverse Dictionary

Have you ever had the right word on the tip of your tongue, but you cannot remember it? Reverse Dictionary is your new ally. Enter a phrase or definition that describes the word you are looking for into the search bar. Therefore the Reverse Dictionary will present you with an inventory of possible matches. It is also an excellent tool for non-native speakers to explore synonyms and grow their vocabulary. Available in Spanish as well!

  1. Ginger

Ginger is an online resource that catches spelling and grammatical mistakes while also helping you learn from these mistakes, just like Grammarly. Non-native English speakers can profit from using its learning centre to boost their knowledge of the English language. Ginger keeps track of your commonest grammar mix-ups and offers personally tailored reports to point out your progress over time. Additionally, to its grammar checker, Ginger includes a dictionary, sentence rephraser, text reader and translation tool.

  1. Online Dictionaries

Online Dictionaries are an invaluable resource to both native English speakers, competent English speakers and even non-English speakers seeking to learn the language. The English dictionary is the bible of the language. It is the centre we all flock to make references about words and their meanings.

Improving your language and writing skills for any language is impossible without the use of the dictionary.

When we read a text and come up with a new word that we don’t know what it means, what do we do? Our instinct is to check out the word in a dictionary. What if I give you an online dictionary tool that helps to list the complex words in any text that you have access to? The English Dictionary makes reading and learning easy for you.

The Beeblio Online Dictionary is more than just a dictionary that teaches you words and their meanings. It is a tool that extracts complex words from texts and searches for its meaning, which makes it easier to study any subject.

This tool is beneficial for students trying to increase their vocabulary range, writers, editors and others. It makes learning an entirely new subject like psychology easy by providing meanings to the complex words you are not familiar with. The Beeblio App also performs this task. It is not yet out, but you can subscribe here for the official release.

7 Ways to improve your english spelling

Building up on our post on ways to practice spelling words, this is for those who want to improve on their spelling.

Some people can speak with the confidence of Barack Obama and the grace of Hilary Clinton, yet when you ask these people to spell the simplest of words. They are completely lost and stumble in their own attempts.

In today’s world, filled with acronyms, abbreviated messages via text, and spell check, when does anyone actually have to spell these days?

Sometimes, we do need our spelling skills, especially if we’re still in school. If you’re at work and called to present a presentation, you will want to be able to recognize the errors on your handouts and visual presentations.

Remember – spell check services are only as good as the programmer who creates them. You, yourself, are the best way to improve your spelling skills.

Fair or not, your spelling skills are used throughout your life to evaluate you as a person.

But what if you’re a reasonably intelligent person with a fairly good sense of written style who, for one reason or another, just doesn’t spell very well? How do you improve your spelling, short of going back to elementary school and sitting through four or five grades of English class again?

There are books and lists of commonly misspelled words available, but they’re too overwhelming to be very useful. Looking things up in the dictionary isn’t all that helpful if you don’t know already that you don’t know how to spell something — or if you can’t spell it well enough to find it!

Those who can spell well have a hard time explaining it, too – it just seems like a natural gift (and of course people who don’t spell well often blame their lack of that “gift”). It is easy to tell people how to spell particular words, but explaining how to spell better in English and how to spell better in spanish overall is trickier. It doesn’t help that people generally look down on others who spell badly, seeing them as people of little education or little intelligence – or both.

If you want to help your kids, learn how to spell better, or it’s for personal use, this post is just for you. It is useful as a means for  how to spell better for adults, then we have got  some techniques and practices that teachers use to teach what is, after all, just a skill, like riding a bike or learning long division. Here are some of the things you should note:

Just as we learn spoken language by hearing lots of people speaking, we learn written language, including spelling, by reading what a lot of people write.

Spelling is not about how a word sounds, it’s about how it looks on the page, which means you have to look at a lot of words on the page to learn how they are spelled.

End of story, really – the first step to improving your spelling has to be to read a lot (and it should go without saying, read a lot of stuff that’s spelled correctly; txtng ur frnds may b fun bt isn’t going 2 hlp ur spllng).

When you catch yourself spelling the same word wrong over and over, write it down somewhere (back of a Moleskine is a good place).

When you get a chance, look it up and put the correct spelling next to it. (Make sure you mark which is correct!) Unlike the massive lists of “commonly misspelled words” in the back of dictionaries and the like, this is a custom list that reflects the words and spelling rules you have trouble with – so instead of a huge list of Other People’s Problems you have a custom-made guide to your own.

Mnemonics are memory tricks or devices, like “i before e except after c”. Since spelling rules are often abstract and, in English, even contradictory (what sound does “gh” make?), they are hard to memorize by themselves.

Mnemonics “sneak in” through a different part of your mind, by rhyming, presenting an image, or forming a pattern that makes better sense than “that’s just how it’s spelled”.Here are some examples of spelling mnemonics:

The National Spelling Bee offers a 36-week spelling course, a lesson a week, by Carolyn Andrews, an ex-teacher and spelling coach to her championship-winning son. Each week’s lesson focuses on an aspect of spelling; taken a week at a time, it’s a good way to cover the basics.

If you look it up more than once, add it to your personal list.

The only way to really learn a word is to use it, and that counts for spelling as much as for learning its meaning.

When you look up how to spell a word, write it down several times in a row, and do it again a day or two later – you’re trying to build up the motor memory of writing it correctly spelled.

Write a blog, a journal, emails, a novel, anything that will keep you using words – and pay special attention as you write to the words that come up wrong (spell-check is good for this, at least!).

Let others read your writing, and ask them to circle misspelled words (or post it to a blog – blog readers make especially harsh taskmasters where spelling errors are involved!)

Better minds than yours and mine have ranted about English spelling rules (or the lack thereof). There has been a near-constant drive for spelling reform for centuries, with advocates including Samuel Johnson, Theodore Roosevelt, H.G. Wells, George Bernard Shaw, and Andrew Carnegie. These efforts have generally been failures, attempts to impose artificial “corrections” on the organic flow of language and writing.

English, it seems, won’t be rationalized, leaving it to each of us to make peace with its foibles and somehow work out how to get things spelt. Hopefully these tips help you begin the process of patching up your own spelling.

Now, Here Are 7 Ways You Can Improve Your Spelling

Most of us look in some type of mirror several times in one day. Write a new vocabulary or hard to spell word on a sticky note. Place it on your mirror and your compact if you have one as well. Every time you look in the mirror, you will see the word, and in time you will know how to effortlessly spell it.

If you always rely on spell check features, you will never be able to rely on your brain. Just don’t make changes with suggestive spellings; pay attention to how the word should be correctly spelled.

A similar phrase is “a book a day; keeps the brain freeze away.” The more you read; the more words you learn.

Why not doodle constructively? Create doodles around hard to spell words (this is a great thing for parents and children alike to do together) and see how quickly you pick up the spelling.

(make sure you’re not writing in library books). This will help you learn new words and increase your vocabulary.

Every time you come across a word you don’t know, write it down. These can later be used as your mirror words.

Software programs are great for kids and adults. An example of a first-rate spelling system is the Ultimate Spelling software package. With Ultimate Spelling, you and your children can improve your spelling abilities while interacting and having fun.

These are seven ways that you can improve your spelling skills. All of them have their strengths, but if you want to do as little as possible to learn (which most children do – and some parents); then a spelling software package is the best bet for you. Everything you need is already included at purchase, and you have the ability to customize the program to match your needs and your interests.

Besides that, here are some more delicate tips to help your spelling get on just fine; or even better!

Learn the Rules

Because of its aforementioned exceptions, learning the rules of English spellings may be easier said than done, but you can at least start to identify common patterns and combinations of letters so that you can begin to guess how a word might be spelled. These could include common endings such as “-een”, “-ough”, and “-tion”, words beginning with a silent K or G, and even homophones (words that sound the same but have different meanings and/or spellings).

Learn the Exceptions to the Rules

Once you’ve learned a rule, make sure you also learn its exceptions. For example, an oft-quoted rule is “I before E except after C”. This is not universally applicable, however, so you’ll need to learn the exceptions to avoid tripping up, such as “weird” and “height”.

Unfortunately, there’s no easy way to learn these exceptions – it’s a matter of being aware of them, trying to remember that a word may not conform to the rule you’ve learned, and memorising the words that don’t.

Crosswords and Codewords

Puzzles are a good way to make your brain work harder and improve your general knowledge, but they’re also a good way to improve your spelling.

Crosswords give you a series of clues that you must fit into overlapping horizontal and vertical boxes, while codewords look similar to crosswords, but involve working out which numbers stand for what letters (meaning that you have to make deductions based on known recurring letters, such as words ending in “-ing”).

If you get the spelling wrong in either a crossword or a codeword the other words won’t fit, so it’s a good idea to have a dictionary beside you.

Watch English Television With Subtitles

You can get better at spelling without even realising it by learning while you’re watching television in English. Simply switch the subtitles on and you’ll see how the words you’re hearing should be spelled.

They’ll be moving too fast for you to make notes, but you’ll learn through osmosis, and this will help you identify instances in which a word you’ve written “just doesn’t look right” – so you can then look it up to find the correct spelling.

Break It Down Into Syllables

For longer words, it can sometimes be helpful to break the word into syllables to help you remember the spelling. Many people get confused with the word “several”, for example, because it looks and sounds similar to “separate”.

We’ve already seen how to remember “separate”, but you could remember “several” by breaking it down into “sev-ER-al”.

“Desperate” is another tricky one because it sounds as though it should be spelt in the same way as “separate”, but breaking it into syllables helps you remember that it’s “desp-ER-ate”.

Word of the Day Emails

You can learn some very odd words with ‘Word of the Day/Week’ emails. Check our own Word of the Week sections.

Word of the day emails are useful for learning new words, but they can also help you learn spellings.

Such emails are generally geared towards helping you learn more unusual words – words that most British people don’t even know – but there are some dedicated to learners, such as this English Learner’s Word of the Day from Merriam-Webster, which teaches you the various meanings of words and the contexts in which they can be used, as well as the spelling and pronunciation (click on the red audio symbol to hear it spoken).

Collect your Word of the Day emails in a dedicated folder on your computer so that you can look back over them, or add each new word to a Post-It note and stick it to your mirror so that you see the new words when you’re getting ready to go out each morning.

Spelling Competitions With Friends

Do you know anyone else who’s learning English? If so, why not challenge them to a spelling competition? Take it in turns giving each other a word to spell and you’d be surprised how much this cements your knowledge.

The competitive element will make it more fun, as well as helping things sink in more easily. You could start by each making a list of the spellings you find trickiest, using a dictionary to help you compile the list if necessary; then try to learn them by heart, and finally swap lists to test each other.

Online Spelling Quizzes

If you don’t have a friend to hand who’s willing to have a spelling competition with you, you could instead try one of the plethora of online spelling quizzes to put your spelling skills to the test.

Here’s one example from The Guardian, but if you Google “spelling quiz”, you’ll find plenty more. Don’t forget to look for the correct spellings of any you got wrong, and perhaps make a note of them for future reference.

Learn Plural Versions

Learning the plural version of a word sadly isn’t as simple as adding an ‘S’ to the end of a word. You can get better at spelling plurals by learning rules for the different plural versions of words, which vary depending on the ending of a word and its origins.

For example, the plural of the word “berry” isn’t “berrys”, it’s “berries”, and the plural of the word “knife” isn’t “knifes” (“knifes” is the third person present tense form of the verb “to knife”), it’s “knives”.

Get the Pronunciation Right

Sometimes, mispronouncing words can lead to spelling errors, because you try to spell the word in the way you think it sounds.

Many English people are guilty of this too, so don’t despair if you find yourself doing it! For example, many people think that the word “espresso” – the coffee – is pronounced “expresso”, and spell it as such, or that the word “clique” is pronounced and spelled “click”.

Even if the pronunciation is correct, it can still land you in trouble. For example, some people struggle to spell “Wednesday” because it’s pronounced “Wensday”.

In this example, the tip we mentioned earlier about breaking it into syllables may prove useful: “Wed-nes-day” might be easier to remember than the word as a whole.

Don’t Read Bad English

Internet forums and social networking sites are a hotbed of poor spelling and grammar, so frequenting English-language sites like these will do you as much harm as good. People make less effort with spelling and grammar when they’re on the internet, and pick up bad habits from other users, perpetuating common spelling errors and creating new ones.

If you’re trying to learn English and get better at spelling, it can seem a good idea to hang out on English-speaking sites and chat to English-speakers, but in fact you may end up learning incorrect spellings without even realising it.

So, try to limit your exposure to English to high-quality written sources, such as newspapers, magazines and books.

SOURCES

Creative ways to practice spelling words at home

Spelling is not one of the most exciting of subjects, but it can be fun by using a variety of these thirty ways to practice your words. Here are creative ways to practice spelling from the comfort of home. 

This post will show you fun ways to practice spelling for 4th grade, fun ways to practice spelling for 2nd grade as well as fun ways to practice spelling for 1st grade..

While you’re at it, check out this post on How to make your spelling better.

Ways To Practice Spelling Words At Home –

Make and Use a “Word Catcher”

These modified fly-swatters can be a lot of fun to use. Give your child a copy of her spelling words, and you might be surprised to see how enthusiastic she is to start swatting the words in all the books, magazines, posters, and papers in the house.

Magnetic Letters, Alphabet Blocks, or Scrabble Pieces

Just as saying the words out loud can help an auditory learner, literally building the words can be helpful for more visual learners. Just keep in mind you might need more than one set of magnetic letters to spell all the words.

Create Your Own Crossword Puzzle

Luckily there are free online tools like Discovery Education’s puzzlemaker program to help you make puzzles. All you have to do is type in the word list.

Use Sensory Play

Some kids learn better when all their senses are involved. Doing things like spraying shaving cream on the table and letting your child trace the words in it or having him write the words with a stick in the dirt can help cement the words in his memory.

Play Spelling Word Memory

There are a couple of ways to do this. You can make two sets of flashcards with the spelling words—it’s a good idea to write each set in a different color—or you can make one set with the words and one with the definition. After that, it’s played just like any other Memory game.

Trace the Words in Rainbow Colors

This is a variation on the old “write your words ten times” homework. Your child can trace each word over and over to remember the order of the letters for each word. In the end, though, it’s a lot prettier than a simple word list.

Let Your Child Text the Words to You

This way to practice spelling words depends, of course, on whether your child has a cell phone and what the plan includes. With unlimited texting, it’s easy enough for you to receive the text, correct the spelling if necessary, and send back an emoji.

Use Sandpaper Letters to Make Spelling Word Rubbings

Though it requires a little prep work, this is a fun way to practice the words. Once you have a set of sandpaper letter stencils, your child can arrange each word, place a piece of paper over it, and make a rubbing with pencil or crayons

Make Word Searches

This, too, is an activity that is easy enough with online resources. SpellingCity.com is a fantastic site that allows you to make word searches and create other activities for your child.

Play Hangman

Hangman is a great go-to game when it comes to spelling words. If you have your child use a copy of the spelling list, it will be easier to narrow down which word you’re using. Remember, you can always use the definition as a clue!

Make up a Spelling Word Song

It may sound silly, but there’s a definite connection between music and literacy. If you and your child are creative, you can create your own silly tune. For the less musically-inclined, try setting the words to the tune of “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” or another nursery rhyme song.

Play the “Add-A-Letter” Game

This game is a fun way to interact with your child. One of you starts writing the spelling word on the paper by writing one letter. The next one adds the next letter. Since many word lists include words that start with the same sounds, it may be challenging to know which word your game partner started writing.

Write a Story Using Each Spelling Word

Many teachers ask students to do this with their spelling words for homework, but you can add a twist by giving your child a topic to write or tell a story about. For example, challenge her to write a story about zombies using all the words.

Highlight the Words in the Newspaper

Give your child a highlighter and a pile of newspapers and time him to see how long it takes to find and highlight all the words on the list.

Play a “What Letter Is Missing?” Game

Slightly different than Hangman and similar to the “Add-a-Letter” game, this game is played by writing or typing the words, but leaving a blank space or two for key letters. Your child will have to put in the correct letters. This works particularly well to practice the vowel sounds.

Act Them Out

Essentially this is playing the game Charades with your child’s spelling words. You can do it a couple of ways—give your child a list of the words and have her guess which one you are acting out or put all the words in a bowl, and have her choose one and act it out.

Put Them in ABC Order

While alphabetizing the list won’t necessarily help your child learn to spell each individual word, it will help him recognize the words. For some children, just moving the strips (on which each word is written) around can help them keep the word in their visual memory.

SOURCES

First grade spelling words list

The 1st Grade is a fundamentally important time in the education of any child. It’s the very foundation of learning, and whatever happens here pretty much determines a lot about a child’s future. The same goes for spelling.

Your first graders need to start on the right track with their spelling. This post contains a first grade vocabulary words list that is sure to do the trick. You can also download the first grade vocabulary words PDF

Your kids will benefit from the first grade vocabulary words with definitions, possibly written on the printed PDF above.

Be sure to check out our other spelling lists; like the 5th Grade Spelling Words list.

Spelling List 1

bat
tooth
spin
fox
sick
pig
ran
your
cut
way
hut
rose
she
bug
brick
people
sun
must
bell
bone
sell
glad
mug
low
have
tuck
part
play

Spelling list 2

kick
an
water
bat
duck
dry
hop
by
note
when
cap
their
big
mob
time
write
up
all
sob
name
hook
each
on
for
must
pit
come
down

Spelling List 3

pet
her
soak
pin
sky
web
can
snow
you
fun
shut
some
thing
to
try
sit
hat
one
rug
cry
soap
trip
stuck
nose
are
plow

Spelling List 4

into
show
hot
which
first
so
oil
pan
nut
coat
hen
page
tape
sat
about
he
ten
boat
these
said
they
find
pot
stop
two
tray
ship
took

Spelling list 5

out
set
mom
legs
like
now
map
moon
at
it
shop
may
pen
fit
bit
but
rock
skin
lip
truck
had
bed
black
made
day
less
grow
how

Spelling List 6

tree
red
then
float
thin
fell
shy
cat
clock
number
kid
get
clay
we
job
town
see
that
this
code
called
many
make
race
them
mad
were
of

Spelling List 7

was
stick
him
my
who
hug
look
what
time
nap
wet
in
not
sack
with
shell
do
back
bow
bad
could
bat
hole
pop
sled
cup
ant
will

Spelling list 8

block
other
cow
well
man
wig
game
mat
pay
as
mop
not
let
hit
snack
been
use
wood
words
sock
from
roof
bun
luck
his
win
be
tan

Spelling List 9

no
go
fed
pool
chop
would
tame
has
dig
there
tell
cob
and
dog
drop
or
spoon
stay
run
load
lot
ink
more
flow
rut
is
shake
long

More Words For Your First Grader

coat
come
cook
cool
corn
could
cram
crew
crib
crow
crowd
crown
cube
dark
deal
desk
dew
dime
dine
dirt
doll
door
draw
dress
drink
drop
dull
each
east

easy
into
jaw
joke
juice
jump
just
keep
king
kite
know
last
lake
late
like
lime
line
live
look
love
luck
made
maid
make
many

 

sink
shake
shirt
ship
shoes
shop
show
shut
sick
side
size
sled
sleep
them
then
there
think
those
tree
under
upon
use
used
very
vest
vote

map
mask
may
meal
meat
meet
round
rub
rubber
sail
sale
same
sank
save
see
seed
seen
seep
sell
send
seven
shall
shape

wait
walk
want
was
water

well
were
west
when
which
white
who
will
wing
winter
with
woman
eight
eleven
end
every
fang
farther
fast
men
mice
milk
mine
mint
mix
moon
slip
slow
sister
smell
snail
snap
snore
women
yell
zero
zone

10th grade spelling words list pdf – free download

 Looks like you are looking to building a vocabulary. Building a vocabulary is very important, and for many reasons. Whether you’re looking to give and build your students’ confidence; or improve their writing and usage of words, or to influence a change in the way they speak and act. This 10th grade spelling words printable list of words is sure to give your 10th graders an extra boost in spelling, to use in 10th grade worksheets, spelling games and other language activities, or just to get a jump on their learning by studying new word lists, it all makes your kids’ vocabulary much better, just like this 11th grade spelling list

Here are new words for your 10th grade spelling words list  printable in this 10th grade spelling words pdf that’ll boost their confidence, and get them prepared for their SATs and ACTs or whatever exams they may be getting set to write.

abstract

divert

oppose

admonish

dormant

panacea

advocate

egocentric

perfunctory

alternative

elusive

preposterous

ambiguous

emulate

precarious

analogy

equitable

precipitate

anarchy

eradicate

preclude

assiduous

estrange

proficient

assimilate

exacerbate

propensity

augment

expedite

qualitative

authentic

fabricate

quantitative

belligerent

facilitate

recalcitrant

bolster

fortuitous

redeem

bureaucratic

fraudulent

rejuvenate

circumvent

heinous

relegate

coalition

hypothetical

relinquish

cohesive

illicit

repugnant

collaborate

imminent

resilient

comply

impetuous

retrospect

concurrent

incongruous

sanction

connotation

indigenous

spontaneous

constituent

indiscriminate

static

contingent

inherent

stringent

emboss

genteel

morale

beguiled

maternal

cumulative

daunted

abnormal

gaseous

appropriation

dilemma

mire

mauled

intuition

enunciate

dialogue

creditor

deficient

clientele

omitted

convulsion

exploit

organic

consultant

inaccessible

fictitious

brandish

 

complement

cosmic

hypocrite

malady

assertive

belated

parables

legacy

eligible

assess

lateral

 

animation

chagrin

inclusive

epic

enumerate

morbid

indisposed

callous

illustrious

objectivity

liquidate

idiom

credibility

allure

passive

consolidate

perception

analogous

impartial

contemplate

enthrall

impertinent

horticulture

dialect

eradicate

humdrum

obtuse

generalization

dramatic

opaque

cynical

equilibrium

infidel

granulates

insufferable

hybrid

pensive

deity

dispense

heritage

confounded

expressly

pigment

hoax

disconcert

devastate

eloquent

magnitude

cryptic

apex

concept

diligent

mediocre

buttress

discretion

frugal

unnecessary

curtail

germinate

frustrate

glean

oblivion

incision

nucleus

cancellation

obituary

perseverance

embryo

incorporate

frivolous

ire

oratory

finale

manipulate

conveyance

formulate

demolition

diverse

invertebrate

grotesque

adage

banter

intolerant

canine

impeach

patronize

occurred

evaluate

bevy

benefactor

denigrate

irony

personnel

enhance

mutation

emit

journal

accentuate

esteem

imperial

dote

crucial

inducement

bogus

absolute

emancipate

capillary

chronic


parry

affront

patron

hapless

parochial

lieutenant

glib

blatant

appalling

martial

incandescent

demure

illegitimate

jargon

permanent

inert

forum

ordinance

flaunt

hysteria

dependent

 

dispel

axiom

betroth

induce

ferret

medley

artisan

chauffer

debutante

satire

amphitheater

feign

fraught

impersonal

allay

auditory

inkling

grovel

likelihood

bauble

narcotic

obnoxious

hove

disgruntle

listless

annihilate

displacement

designate

 

 futile

colleague

obscene

glaze

temperament

perspective

automation

dissection

enlighten

inevitable

invincible

disintegrate

delve

despondent

glutton

embellish

overture

bolster

compile

exasperate

incriminate

gratify

pinnacle

pertinent

linear

gore

helpless

ensemble

 

adept

boisterous

conclusive

girth

eccentric

dormant

momentum

depreciate

humiliate

banality

misconception

elongate

component

invoke

annul

anonymous

deteriorate

humility

carnivorous

inquisitive

courier

organism

default

imperative

havoc

benevolent

Best list of words for 11th grade Student

The 11th grade spelling words with definitions are a lovely addition to your teens’ to-do list. It is worth their time. They are a level above the 10th grade spelling words. These new words and their meanings are what they need to pass any 11th grade spelling words Quizlet. They are words they will likely encounter in other school subjects. Learning them now is an early boost to their studies.

11th Grade Spelling Words with Definitions

  1. ABSTRACT: Relating to ideas or qualities rather than specific objects, people, or actions.
  2. ACCOLADE: An award to praise or celebrate an achievement.
  3. BIASED: Showing a willingness to believe that somebody or something is better than others in an unfair way.
  4. BREVITY: Using a few words to express yourself or something; lasting for only a short time.
  5. CALLOUS: Not showing or feeling any empathy or concern about the situation of other people.
  6. CENSURE: An official strong criticism.
  7. DEPRECIATE: To reduce in value.
  8. DESPOT: A person or ruler who wields total or a lot of power over others and often uses the powers for personal and selfish benefit.
  9. EDIFICE: A large building with impressive structures.
  10. ERRONEOUS: A grave error; not correct.
  11. FORMIDABLE: Very difficult to deal with; large or impressive in size; very powerful and strong, and deserving of respect and attention.
  12. FRIVOLOUS: Not important or deserving of attention; silly and not serious.
  13. GRUELING: Very difficult to do; needing a lot of effort.
  14. HAPHAZARD: To do something by chance without any plan, direction, or order of the sort.
  15. HERETIC: A person who teaches a doctrine that conflicts with what is the generally accepted belief.
  16. INCESSANT: Continuing with interruption; not stopping.
  17. INCITE: To spark or cause someone to act in a harmful, angry, or violent manner.
  18. JUDICIOUS: Ability to show good judgment.
  19. LAVISH: Giving or using a large amount of something; having a very rich and expensive quality.
  20. MEAGER: Very small quantity; not having enough of something for comfort.
  21. MEANDER: To move without a clear purpose, goal, or direct; to follow an indirect path instead of a straight or direct one.
  22. NEGLIGENT: To abandon your responsibilities towards someone or something; not to give proper attention and care to someone or something.
  23. OBLITERATE:  To destroy something so that nothing is left.
  24. PREREQUISITE: Something you must do before you can have or do something else.
  25. RIGOROUS:  To do something carefully and thoroughly; difficult to cope with because of strict demands.
  26. SURMISE: An idea or thought based on little or no evidence.
  27. TIRADE: A lengthy angry speech that contains harsh language.
  28. USURP: To take something you have no right to violently and forcefully.
  29. VACILLATE: To change your desires, ideas, and opinions repeatedly.
  30. WHIMSICAL: Not serious; done unusually and amusingly.

The above selected 30 words that make up this 11th grade spelling words pdf are important for all teens to know, master, and use appropriately. They can even try their luck and take the 12th grade spelling words Quizlet.

SOURCES

Best words 4th grade students should know

Your 4th Graders are just coming into their first serious vocabularies. The 4th Grade is a time where your kids are ready to work on building lots of compound words, adding prefixes and suffixes and nailing down tricky sets of homophones. That’s why it is important that you give them lots of practice in all these areas; and that’s why we’ve compiled over 300 words in this 4th grade spelling words list; enough to keep your 4th Graders busy and ready for bigger, more difficult words, like these 5th grade spelling words.

We’ve also made the 4th grade spelling words printable.

Here are 4th grade spelling words week 1.

against

agree

 airport

 alarm

 alive

allright

alley

alphabet

although

always

angriest

angry

animal

answer

asleep

attack

 aunt

banana

 battle

 beautiful

beauty

become

 beggar

 believe

 belong

between

 blanket

blood

bottle

bought

bounce

breath

bridge

broke

broken

brought

bubble

building

built

busy

button

buying

calf

 camera

 cardboard

caring

 carrying

catch

 center

 certain

chance

charge

cheer

chicken

chief

choice

choose

chore

 chose

circle

cities

clothing

 coast

 coin

comb

common

 copy

corner

 cottage

 cotton

couch

cough

 couldn’t

 couple

 cousin

cover

 crayon

crime

crooked

 crow

crowd

crumb

curl

dairy

damage

danger

dawn

deaf

dear

death

decide

 degree

 deliver

didn’t

dirty

disappear

 dislike

 divide

double

downstairs

drain

 drawer

earlier

earn

earth

easier

 eighty

either

 electric

engine

enough

evening

except

 

faint

false

famous

fear

feather

 felt fever

few

fifth

 fifty

final

Follow

forever

 forgive

forty

fourth

 fright

gentle

giant

glance

gold

grandfather

grandmother

groceries

 grown

guard

handsome

happiest

he’ll

he’s

 health

 heard

hiking

holiday

honey

 honor

hospital

hour

however

howl

hundred

hungry

hurry

husband

important

 interest

invite

jacket

 jaw

 judge

Juice

kindness

kitchen

 kneel

 knight

libraries

library

listen

lonely

Loyal

machine

 mailbox

meant

 medal

middle

mirror

mistake

moment

monkey

 movement

neighbor

neither

nickel

ninety

ninth

no-one

nobody

o’clock

obeyed

odd

office

often

paper

parent

paste

path

peaceful

pencil

perfect

picture

planet

playground

pleasing

police

powerful

 proper

public

question

quiet

quilt

quit

 quite

railroad

reach

 ready

 reason

 remember

return

 ridge

roast

 roof

rough

round ruler

safe

sauce

scrap

search

 season

self

seventh

seventy

sharp

 she’ll

 she’s

shout

sidewalk

sigh

sign

simple

since

sink

sixth

sixty

sleeve

smooth

 sneeze

soften

 spare

special

squirrel

steal

steel

strange

studied

Studying

style

suppose

tennis

 thirty

thumb

tool

towel

 tube

Tuna

twenty

 twice

uncle

 understand

useful

useless

village

visit

wait

 weather

 weight

whenever

whether

 wife

wonder

wood

world

worried

wrist

worse

wouldn’t

 written

yourself

zebra

zero

zipper

zoo

friends

fugitive

pineapple

perhaps

speed

choir

fountain

goose

hammer

council

hostile

fatal

jewel

community

compass

salute

subject

children

reject

difference

ankle

husband

center

filled

tomatoes

tutor

alarm

bubble

 

college

hotel

contest

population

muffin

hollow

transport

reptile

fresh

illegal

basin

slavery

heaven

region

nutrients

catch

yourself

prime

compose

character

queen

cotton

couldn’t

potato

bay

bridge

fingers

lower

poison

kingdom

keyboard

castle

garbage

vocal

syllables

seventy

mountain

return

across

cannon

memory

early

site

distraction

retain

chain

itself

products

abuse

remember

export

problem

axe

thirty

resist

usefulness

 

puzzle

member

believe

prince

public

extend

deposit

language

compatible

against

except

professional

rather

actor

bargain

today

portal

suddenly

courage

corner

since

neutral

destroyed

object

damage

cousin

certain

congress

 

vowel

special

owner

robot

government

electricity

parallel

complete

energy

inaccurate

carton

ready

positive

elevator

during

anyone

bucket

eighteen

whine

program

chapel

crowd

synonym

charge

legislative

monster

joined

permanent

 

heavy

seventeen

sheriff

rolled

depend

antonym

abundant

illegible

comment

equator

ghost

wildfire

prey

several

mark

adopt

computer

climate

twelve

towel

coastal

heart

absolute

developed

academic

thousands

maybe

proposal

 

university

button

nail

rumor

guest

explain

homework

vegetable

temporary

mental

generalize

villain

oxen

utensil

happened

kilometer

Europe

heard

fragile

entrepreneur

carrot

square

anything

harmful

predator

questions

apron

consumer

 

engineer

astronomy

tunnel

piece

appliance

universe

oval

ounce

umbrella

order

factory

whom

toward

alone

bridal

knight

duet

negative

thrive

bother

cells

pumpkin

import

dental

private

publish

organism

storage

 

producer

covered

material

raccoon

become

measure

twenty

burning

browser

tropical

include

orphan

inflation

series

solo

pledge

lukewarm

technology

window

slowly

hours

monitor

mortal

quiz

compromise

usually

SOURCES

5th grade spelling words updated list 2020

Looks like you are looking to building a vocabulary. Building a vocabulary is very important, and for many reasons. Whether you’re looking to give and build your students’ confidence; or improve their writing and usage of words, or to influence a change in the way they speak and act, to give your 5th graders an extra boost in spelling, to use in 5th grade worksheets, spelling games and other language activities, or just to get a jump on their learning by studying new word lists, it all makes your kids’ vocabulary much better, just like this 4th grade spelling list.

Here’s a 5th grade spelling words list of 300 new words for your 5th graders that’ll boost their confidence, and get them speaking at a more advanced level. You could also use this as a 5th grade spelling words worksheet.

Here are 5th grade spelling words common core

action

actor    

actually   

addition       

agreed

allowed   

aloud   

amendment 

amount 

amusement

annual

appointed 

arrange    

attention     

awhile

beginning

bruise  

business   

calves       

capital

capitol   

captain  

carefully  

caught       

cause

celebrate

century

chemical

chocolate     

circle

climate

climbed   

collar     

column          

company

condition

consider

consonant

constant

continent

continued

country

course

crystal

current

curtain

daughter

daytime

decided

decimal

delicious

desert

dessert

details

determine

dictionary

difference

different

difficult

direction

disappoint

division

eighth

election

elements

energy

enjoyment

equal

equation

errands

exact

except

expect

explain

explode

express

factory

fault

favorite

finally

finished

forward

fought

fraction

furniture

future

general

government

graceful

graph

grasp

grease

grown-ups

guest

guide

happened

happily

harvest

healthy

height

hoarse

human

idea

imagine

 include

increase

 indicate

information

instrument

intention

interesting

 inventor

island

jewel

journey

jungle

knives

known

 language

 laughter

length

 limb

located

lumber

major

mammal

 manufacture

material

mayor

measure

melody

 members

 memories

 message

method

million

 minor

 modern

 mountain

 music

natural

necessary

 neither

newspaper

northern

notebook

notice

noun

 numeral

 object

observe

opposite

 orphan

 ought

 outside

oxygen

paid

paint

paragraph

pattern

pause

payment

perhaps

period

permit

phone

phrase

pleasant

pleasure plural

poison

position

possible

practice

prepared

president

probably

problem

process

produce

program

promise

property

protection

provide

puzzle

quickly

quietly

radio

raise

rarely

rather

reached

receive

record

region

relax

remain

remove

repay

repeat

report

represent

respond

result

rhythm

rising

ruin

salad

sandal

scale

scent

 schedule

science

section

separate

service

settled

several

 shadow

shelter

shoulder

shouted

shower

 signal

similar

sincerely

 single

size

slippery

soar

soil

 solution

 solve

 southern

split

 spoiled

 sports

 square

 squeeze

stain

 state

 statement

 station

 steer

stomach

 stopping

 straight

straighten

stream

stretched

suggest

suitcase

 sunset

supply

sure

surface

 surprise

 surround

sweater

syllable

 syrup

 tablet

 tasty

 teaspoon

terrible

though

 thoughtful

 thrown

tornado

toward

traffic

trail

treasure

 treatment

triangle

 trouble

tunnel

 type

understood

unknown

 usually

 value

various

 warn

weigh

weight

weird

western

 whisper

whoever

whole

whose

wives

women

wonderful

wound

wreck

 x-ray

 yesterday

If that’s not enough to get your 5th graders up there, here’s a word bank of extra words that will do just the trick in keeping them ever so active.

rough

grudge

stunt

thumb

once

another

does

trouble

cousin

began

oxygen

copy

very

until

umpire

sudden

which

city

 

afraid

explain

payment

sleigh

laid

raise

straight

freight

height

they

favorite

April

able

radio

station

relation

daybreak

trace

 

fifteen

referee

eager

easily

ready

please

ecology

maybe

been

only

universe

future

communicate

beautiful

unusual

cute

cube

fuel

adventure

cinquain

proverb

trait

stress

salutation

prose

lyric

limerick

haiku

 

 

characterization

context

drama

entertain

euphemism

imperative

interrogative

pamphlet

repetition

source

 

symbolism

usage

variable

claim

schedule

root

pitch

mystery

diagram

imperative

We’ve also got compound words for your 5th graders to spell

earthquake

countdown

candlestick

barefoot

bathrobe

classroom

fingernail

roommate

dashboard

overdue

breakfast

shipwreck

tombstone

wildlife

guardrail

suitcase

surfboard

tiptoe

lighthouse

chairperson

Here are some extra words they’ll find familiar in other subjects.

brazen

mighty

conquer

fame

Greek

harbor

beacon

astride

torch

limb

 

expression

equation

evaluate

pattern

equivalent

inequality

relationship

forms

variable

 

resistor

electron

battery

terminal

positive

electric

negative

circuit

electromagnet

electricity

consumer

demand

costs

economy

specialization

trade

competition

barter

export

consumer

 

comic

ostrich

Connecticut

insult

grumble

gallop

hurry

distinct

contestant

defendant

assistant

brilliant

compliant

extravagant

ignorant

consonant

applicant

migration

route

trace

 

 

design

bruise

awkward

picnic

bicycle

triple

trilogy

trinity

duplicate

quadruple

unicycle

duplex

uniform

quartet

quadrant

octave

rhythm

cadence

3rd Grade Spelling words list you should know

This 3rd grade spelling words master list is the ideal learning resource to build the vocabulary of third graders. It contains both easy and challenging 3rd grade spelling words list. We use these words every day or regularly. These words are confident boosters and help kids to write, communicate, and express themselves better. With these words, they can attempt 5th grade spelling words and score a decent grade!

3rd grade spelling words list

 
  1. ABOUT: Very close to doing something; nearly or almost.
  2. ACROSS: On the opposite side of someone or something, from one side to the other
  3. AFRAID: To be full of concern, fear or regret for something or someone
  4. AFTERNOON: The part of the day between morning and evening.
  5. AGE: The number of years or amount of time a thing (living or non-living) has lived.
  6. AGO: Before now; in the past.
  7. ALMOST: Close to but not exact; only a little less than.
  8. ALSO: In a similar way; in addition to.
  9. ANYONE: Any person of any kind.
  10. ANYTHING: A thing of any kind.
  11. BALLOON: A thin rubber bag that expands when it is filled with gas or air.
  12. BASKET: A container for keeping items made by weaving long thin pieces of materials together
  13. BEAR: An animal that has thick hair and sharp claws and can stand straight on two like a person; to accept or endure something or someone.
  14. BEHIND: In or towards the back; in the place that someone is going away from.
  15. BIRTHDAY: The day when someone was born that is celebrated every year.
  16. BLIND: Unable to see someone or something; accepting something or someone without asking questions
  17. BODY: The whole physical part of a person or animal.
  18. BOX: A rectangular container for storing items.
  19. BREAD: A common food made from mixing flour and water, eaten all over the world.
  20. BUILD: To make something by putting together parts or materials.
  21. CARRY: To change the position of something by holding it; to take a thing along with you or on your body.
  22. CATCH: To hold a moving person or something with the hand; to stop an individual or thing from moving.
  23. CHANGE: To become something different, to make something or someone different.
  24. CHEESE: A food containing compressed milk.
  25. CHERRY: A small round fruit that is usually red or black; the tree on which this fruit grows.
  26. CIRCUS: A lively show that is performed in a tent, and includes tricks by clowns, trained animals, acrobats, etc., and draws a large crowd.
  27. CLASS: A group of students who meet regularly to be taught a subject or activity.
  28. CLEAR: Easily understood; very obvious.
  29. CLIMB: To move or go up something using your feet and often your hands; movement that involves going up or down.
  30. COLOR: The basic image quality in the form of light you see when you look at a thing.
  31. DINNER: The main meal of the day; a large formal event where this meal is served.
  32. DOCTOR: A trained professional that treats sick and injured people.
  33. DOLLAR: The basic unit of money spent in the United States, Australia, Canada, and other countries.
  34. DONE: To finish a task.
  35. DRIVING: To cause or control something to move.
  36. EASY: Not hard to do.
  37. EYES: The part of the body that you can see with.
  38. FINISH: To reach the end of something; to cause something to end or stop.
  39. FOOD: The things that people and animals eat.
  40. GIFT: A special present or packing given to someone by somebody; a special ability.
  41. GUESS: To form an opinion or give an answer to something when you do not know much or anything about it.
  42. HALF: One or two equal or nearly equal parts into which something can be divided.
  43. HEAVY: Having great weight; difficult to lift or move.
  44. HELLO: An expression used as a form of greeting
  45. KEY: A metal object for opening the lock of a door.
  46. LAMB: A young sheep; the meat of a lamb.
  47. LAUGH: A facial expression you make to show that you are pleased and happy or to a remark at something amusing and funny.
  48. MORNING: The early part of the day; the part of the day between midnight and noon.
  49. NEWSPAPER: A set of paper packed together as one that has news about various topics such as sports, business, crime, local events, etc., and sold on a daily or weekly basis
  50. NOISE: A loud sound that is not pleasing to the ears.

The 3rd grade spelling words pdf  is a list of 50 words for kids to add to their vocabulary. They are all carefully selected words to build the vocabulary of 3rd graders.

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The complete sat vocabulary practice guide 2020

Taking the SAT is no small feat. In fact it’s very serious business. A solid vocabulary is essential to getting a high SAT score. But what methods can give you the quality SAT vocab practice you’ll need to succeed on test day? After all, just reading a lengthy list of vocab words doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll know how to use them in a sentence or be able to remember what they mean on during the exam. You can also practice by checking out these ways to practice spelling words.

What kind of SAT vocabulary practice questions should you be looking at? The truth is that vocabulary doesn’t play a very big role on the SAT scores. So if you’re not a fan of memorizing hundreds of words, this is great news! However, if you’re aiming for a high or even perfect SAT score, you’ll definitely need to memorize some of the vocab words most likely to appear on the test.

But what exactly does vocabulary look like on the SAT? 

For starters, all vocab questions (in both the Reading and Writing and Language sections) are based on reading passages, so you’ll always have context to help you figure out the meaning of a word or phrase. On the old (pre-2016) SAT, you had Sentence Completion questions, for which you had to choose the correct vocab word for an isolated sentence. Basically, you had zero context! Thankfully, these questions are no longer on the SAT.

Secondly, all vocab words are about medium difficulty, so don’t expect to see hard words such as pugnacious and obstreperous. Instead, the SAT will test you on more common words, usually ones with multiple meanings.

On SAT Reading, vocab questions are called Words in Context questions; these ask you to match a word with the correct meaning. On the Writing section, vocab questions that ask you to replace (or leave as is) a certain word in a passage are called Precision questions.

 SAT preparation requires careful planning and diligent adherence to it for a student to score high on the test. English reading is the longest section, where SAT vocabulary knowledge is put to test the most. Regarding SAT vocabulary a significant change in the exam is testing students on how well can they use a word in different contexts? Earlier in the old format, the focus was on testing knowledge of word meaning. Now, the following types and a number of reading passages are included in the new SAT reading section:

  • A passage from a classic or contemporary piece of US or world literature.
  • A passage (or pair of passages) based on a US founding document or text in the Great Global Conversation.
  • A passage on social science.
  • Two science passages.

These are meant to test how widely read you are; and how much of the materials you read you understand properly in context and usage. The SAT examiners expect candidates to not limit reading to just school work, but extra curricular affairs as well.

Meanwhile, SAT writing section will have passages on:

  • History
  • Social studies
  • Science

Based on these new changes, following the suggestions given below will help you improve on your vocabulary on SAT:

Read widely

As mentioned above SAT English reading and writing section includes a wide variety of topics. Therefore, regularly reading a wide variety of articles, books, magazines, and newspapers will help you enormously. Cultivating a discipline of reading long articles every day and being conscious of diversity in topics will:

  • Make you comfortable with the varying writing style, tone, and genre.
  • Broaden your knowledge of content-specific vocabulary.
  • Improve your reading speed.
  • Expose you to a wide variety of viewpoints and ideas.

Learn word meaning from context

On the SAT test, vocabulary questions can be segmented under two categories:

Words in context questions-that ask you to match a word with the correct meaning.

Precision questions- in the writing section, they ask you to replace (or leave as is) a certain word in a passage.

Cramming the meaning of the word will not be of much help. The test is to see how well you can use words in a different context.

For example: “Fix” as a word means to repair. However, depending on the context of its usage in a passage its meaning can change from a repair or mend to solve a problem or improve on something.

To expand on SAT English vocabulary practice reading in context. Whenever you come across a word you do not know the meaning of while reading, you should do the following:

  • Try to use the context of the sentence to guess its meaning.
  • Use a Thesaurus. A thesaurus will give you a group of synonyms and related concepts for words.
  • If you struggle with understanding the correct meaning of a word, do not get stuck on it. Write down the word and its definition and continue reading to finish the passage. Study or discuss the word with your teacher later to understand it better.

Learn word roots, prefixes, and suffixes

Learning vital word roots can help you expand your SAT English vocabulary easily. Word root is the simplest form of a word. When combines with other words they form new words:

  • For example “a”. It has a Latin origin, meaning “on”.
  • Words using “a” are – afire meaning on fire; ashore meaning on the shore; aside meaning on the side

Prefixes and suffixes are a group of words used before or after a word to form new words. Knowing the meaning of commonly used prefixes and suffixes can help expand one’s vocabulary significantly.

Build a vocabulary list

  • Use free resources-There are a lot of free resources on the web that provide vocabulary lists for students to learn from. Be sure to use lists that are tailor-made for new format SAT test. Such lists are based on past SAT exams to contain a repository of words that are frequently used in the SAT test. Using random lists that contain advance or difficult words may not prove to be very beneficial. Two lists can prove usefull: an SAT vocabulary practice worksheets pdf, for studying and an SAT vocabulary practice test pdf for testing your knowledge
  • Practice new words- Knowing the meaning or reading a word once will not help you much in memorizing and remembering new words. To considerably improve upon your vocabulary knowledge purposely make an effort to use the new words learned, in your conversation, writing assignments, emails, texts, and practice essays. The more you recall and use a new word while learning, the more likely you are to remember it permanently.
  • Sign up for the SAT question of the day-The College Board has resources to help students refine their SAT vocabulary. Include this in your study plan. Anytime you come across an unfamiliar word, look for its meaning, and memorize it by trying to use it in your verbal and written conversation immediately.

Take an Online SAT Vocabulary Practice Tests and Quizzes

Tests and quizzes are a great way to build SAT English vocabulary knowledge. There are free websites that let you practice and test with pre-made and customizable flashcards. Three such widely used websites are:

  • Quizlet – A mobile and web-based study application that allows students to study via learning tools such as flashcards and games.
  • Anki – An open-source, media-rich learning tool that uses spaced repetition for its functioning.

It uses a study technique where its users are quizzed more often on the information they struggle with.

  • Vocabulary.com – It has an adaptive learning system that lets you create your own vocabulary list. It also offers over 50,000 ready-to-learn vocabulary lists tailored made for SAT. With academic games it will help determine what level of learning support one requires to master vocabulary one is aiming for.
  • The College Board – We’ve already talked about the importance of using full-length SAT practice tests, but this isn’t everything. Through the College Board website, you can access tons of official SAT practice questions, some of which center on vocab. In total, you’ll get 24 SAT Reading and 22 Writing questions, complete with in-depth answer explanations. Though most of these questions aren’t vocab questions, you can still use them to practice reading in context and to get a better feel for the types of words you’ll be expected to know on these two sections.
  • Khan Academy – A partner of the College Board, Khan Academy is a free website offering tons of official SAT practice questions, which you can use to get even more quality SAT vocab practice. With this website, you can not only practice vocab in the context of realistic SAT questions, but you can also get tips on how to answer Reading and Writing questions and how to read passages effectively.
  • Newspapers and Publications – If you’re studying vocab by reading in context, you’ll need to find relevant articles in order to get high-quality SAT vocab practice. Studying for the SAT involves reading articles on a wide variety of topics.

Using these strategies on a regular basis and following the suggestions will certainly help you learn new words much quicker and faster to build a strong SAT vocabulary list.

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